What is it doing?

Please excuse my ignorance. I am new to the PC world and do not know your customs and etiquette. I want to know of there is a program that tells me what my hard drive is doing. Sometimes it just runs and runs and I have no idea why.

People tell me to look at Task Manager. It has a list of 50 things with names I don’t understand. I could start getting rid of them by picking names I don’t like, but that sounds dangerous.

Is is too much to ask to want to know what the frak my computer is doing right now?

Advertisements

7 Responses to What is it doing?

  1. Kindralas says:

    You hard drive spinning is not a big deal. Chances are you’ll replace the machine before the hard drive motor gives. Depending on what all you have going on, it could just be random drive accessing, since Windows tends not to fill up your memory with stuff you might use as a Mac does. It could also be running virtual memory off the hard drive, but I would imagine you’re not taxing your physical memory that much.

    As for your processes, you can google any of them to find out what they do. There’s plenty of process libraries out there. If you find some malware, then just right clickthe process and open its location, then end the process, then delete the file. There’s occasionally some other cleanup, but most stuff you don’t want can be gotten rid of easily that way.

  2. Kathy says:

    As has already been noted, the drive accessing isn’t a big deal. (I’d worry about it more on a laptop on battery power because it might run the battery down.) If you want to get an idea what the culprit is, though, all you have to do is sort that list of processes by CPU to put the largest percentages of CPU processing cycles at the top and you can get an idea of what is hitting your HD that way, because the CPU cycles it uses will spike around the same time the HD accesses happen. Not really a big deal, though. Windows and other apps shuffle stuff around for various reasons…it’s just more noticable when the machine is idle.

  3. Shocho says:

    Thank you ma’am and sir. I did punch in a couple of processes to Google, and everything seems to be okay. I’ll just stop worrying, I think that will help.

    We’re having what appears to be firewall issues with the PCs and WoW (I suspect this because the Mac ran WoW fine today with no kicks or lag). Which is a different thing, but I’ll futz with that too.

  4. Kindralas says:

    that can be a trickier problem to solve. If it’s Windows Defender’s firewall that’s the problem, you can just tell it to allow WoW, and all will be well. With third party firewalls, you’ll have to turn it off for WoW’s ports. Best let a PC inclined friend do that, though you can probably google up the answer to that too.

  5. Shocho says:

    I have WoW as an exception in my Windows Firewall. I have McAfee security stuff, and I turned off the McAfee firewall, thinking two firewalls is too many frakking firewalls. That make sense?

  6. Shocho says:

    Actually, I read some more on the Internets (quite helpful, those things) and the suggestion seems to be turn off the Windows firewall and turn on the McAfee. Then I made sure that WoW has full inbound/outbound access in the McAfee firewall. I believe, in my heart of hearts, that this setup will be a Good Thing(TM). Faith is a powerful tool in solving computer problems.

  7. Blancpain says:

    As has already been noted, the drive accessing isn't a big deal. (I'd worry about it more on a laptop on battery power because it might run the battery down.) If you want to get an idea what the culprit is, though, all you have to do is sort that list of processes by CPU to put the largest percentages of CPU processing cycles at the top and you can get an idea of what is hitting your HD that way, because the CPU cycles it uses will spike around the same time the HD accesses happen. Not really a big deal, though. Windows and other apps shuffle stuff around for various reasons…it's just more noticable when the machine is idle.; As has already been noted, the drive accessing isn't a big deal. (I'd worry about it more on a laptop on battery power because it might run the battery down.) If you want to get an idea what the culprit is, though, all you have to do is sort that list of processes by CPU to put the largest percentages of CPU processing cycles at the top and you can get an idea of what is hitting your HD that way, because the CPU cycles it uses will spike around the same time the HD accesses happen. Not really a big deal, though. Windows and other apps shuffle stuff around for various reasons…it's just more noticable when the machine is idle.;;

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: